spiritualsnippets.com

Seeing life's events in the light of God's Word.

The Father of Compassion

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2 Corinthians 1:3-4  “Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of compassion and the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our troubles, so that we can comfort those in any trouble with the comfort we ourselves have received from God.”

 

The word father refers to the male person who is the source of life for his offspring. But, the term father is so much more than simply referring to procreation, the physical act.

It is a man who gives care and protection to his offspring.

Someone who begins or originates an idea or work is also referred to as a father. For, instance, we say that George Washington is the Father of our country… that James Madison is the Father of the constitution… the term founding fathers credits certain men for their work in establishing our government…

Christians pray to God, our Heavenly Father.

The verse in second Corinthians tells us that God is the Father of Compassion. 

Because God IS love, compassion for us and our sufferings naturally flows from Him.

Through prayer and the leading of the Holy Spirit, we can tap into that source of love and compassion and use it to comfort others.

God is the originator. 

The source.

Our compassionate Heavenly Father.

 

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Six Words

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2 Timothy 4: 1-7 “In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who will judge the living and the dead, and in view of his appearing and his kingdom, I give you this charge: Preach the word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage—with great patience and careful instruction. For the time will come when people will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear. They will turn their ears away from the truth and turn aside to myths. But you, keep your head in all situations, endure hardship, do the work of an evangelist, discharge all the duties of your ministry. For I am already being poured out like a drink offering, and the time for my departure is near. I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. Now there is in store for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, will award to me on that day—and not only to me, but also to all who have longed for his appearing.”

 

Women giving birth anticipate hearing their baby’s first cry.

Lovers long to hear those three little words: “I Love You.”

Christians look forward to seeing Jesus in Heaven and hearing Him say, “Well done, good and faithful servant.”

We have believed that Christ died for our sins and accepted His saving grace.

We have done our part in spreading the gospel.

We have used the talents God gifted us with for the good of our Christian community and local church.

We have helped those less fortunate than ourselves.

We have accomplished the purpose God had for us.

We have interceded for others in prayer.

We have encouraged others to persevere in the midst of adversity.

We have run the race…finished the course.

Someday we will rejoice with others as we hear Him say, “Well, done, good and faithful servant.” 

 

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Who’s Driving?

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Proverbs 3:5- “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding.”

 

Do you put God in the driver’s seat, but then act as a backseat driver?

This is a question someone asked on Christian radio a few weeks ago—and it is still in my thoughts—nagging at me, prodding me to answer the question for myself.

If you are like me, we play backseat driver more often than we’d like to admit. 

Sometimes it amounts to praying about something and, rather than waiting on God, we take things into our own hands.

Other times, it is coming up with what we think is a good idea and running with it, instead of even asking His direction in the first place. It may seem like a Godly thing to do—or even worthy because in our mind it is an act of service for God—so we forge ahead without prayerful consideration.

I’m sure you can come up with many examples of backseat driving.

The point is: God wants to lead us. But, before He can do that, we must share our needs and ask Him for direction.

Then, comes the hard part: Waiting for the answer and/or resisting the urge to do it our way.

Can you just hear Him say, “Who’s driving? You or Me?”

If we would only learn to let Him have the wheel, we could relax in the backseat—even enjoy the scenery as we look out the window. 

We can trust Him to get us where we’re going.

After all, He knows the road ahead.

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